i want to sox yuO

YASSY GOLDIE/GJYD

@Alter_Projects
#soxYuO
#ILLUMINUSboston
#HUBweek
#ArtLifeBoston

Visitors will enter an actual Fenway souvenir shop, where they will encounter a large screen projecting actual silent videos -- cheap “infomercials” -- inspired by creation and marketing of Red Sox memorabilia. Kitschy and funny, at times confusing, the cultural tradition of Red Sox goods will be morphed and be on display. The humorous installation will compel the viewer to take a second look at this almost-familiar logo and tagline. These cheap infomercials mark the return of Boston’s infamous anonymous artist group gjyd and their Master Representative Yassy Goldie.

 

 

Project sponsored by
FORTY SEVEN BRAND

Presented in partnership with
ALTER PROJECTS



YASSY GOLDIE & GJYD

gjyd and Yassy Goldie are a popular yet anonymous artist group that has been celebrated in Boston since 2009. These artists use humor and irony to tell stories, fight against prejudice and bring people together. Their work includes installation, video and performance. They have exhibited regularly, including installations and performances at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, the Charles Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Science and the Mills Gallery at the Boston Center for the Arts.


curator-image.jpg

CURATOR'S STATEMENT

MAGGIE CAVALLO, ALTER PROJECTS

Yassy Goldie has always been somewhat of an outsider, a foreigner to nearly everyone, no matter where he appears. The i want to sox yuO campaign designed by Goldie and gjyd for Illuminus Boston is an attempt to re-introduce themselves to the City of Boston on a grand scale. The group has designed infomercials and gifs for specialized merchandise, including beer cans lottery tickets and baseballs, inspired by the Boston Red Sox, but translated into their own signature aesthetic and language. Infomercial-style videos suggest. 

This project represents Goldie’s attempt at assimilating to and celebrating Boston’s culture. This type of assimilation (and isolation) is common for many individuals who move to Boston, especially artists who struggle to identify how to make work that will be successful in our own city. The i want to sox yuO memorabilia, while grammatically confusing, suggests we are all the Sox while also poking fun at the fact that the stereotypically sports-infused culture of our region leaves little room for artists to gain recognition.


ARTIST INTERVIEW